“Buy Now, Pay Later” – is a type of short-term loan that has taken the American marketplace by storm. According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, U.S. consumers borrowed $2 billion via “BNPL” in 2019. In 2021 that number grew by more than 1,000 percent to $24.2 billion. Companies like Affirm, Afterpay, Klarna and PayPal have created these loans for borrowers to purchase everything from high-end electronics and jewelry to everyday staples like groceries and utilities.


When a company learns a product it sells could be defective and dangerous, it has 24 hours to let the federal government’s Consumer Product Safety Commission know about it. But it could take months or years for the public to find out about the company’s possible concerns, if they even come to light at all. InvestigateTV has been battling CPSC and companies to disclose information about the products companies have sounded the alarm on – an alarm that remains relatively silent.



Full Episodes

News

Help for low-literacy voters, minors in the custody of metro Atlanta’s Division of Family and Children services falling victim to sex trafficking, homeowners losing their houses to unpaid taxes, and the importance of getting a will all in this week’s episode of InvestigateTV.

News

Public universities are firing losing coaches, paying millions of dollars to buy out their contracts, hackers are targeting online gamers, a look into doping in horse racing, a warning on banking related scams.

News

InvestigateTV’s Lee Zurik reports on a law preventing officials from immediately informing the public about dangerous products. Consumer Investigator Caresse Jackman investigates over 250,000 consumer complaints from service members, military families and veterans about inaccurate information on their credit reports. Plus, we investigate a government employee imposter scam and Consumer Investigator Rachel DePompa look at ways to offset the recent inflation spike.

News

This week: National special education requirements, the challenges for families, states are getting short changed on federal special education funding. Then, homeschooling numbers remain high post-pandemic, plus con artists now target teachers during the school day.

Investigations

Investigations

When a company learns a product it sells could be defective and dangerous, it has 24 hours to let the federal government’s Consumer Product Safety Commission know about it. But it could take months or years for the public to find out about the company’s possible concerns, if they even come to light at all. InvestigateTV has been battling CPSC and companies to disclose information about the products companies have sounded the alarm on – an alarm that remains relatively silent.

Consumer

In a 2022 study presented to the National Bureau of Economic Research, data showed that phony testimonies cost customers an extra $0.12 cents for each dollar spent – meaning you could spend up to an extra 12 percent because of fake reviews. But fake online reviews don’t always have an immediate financial impact, some small businesses are seeing their reputations damaged from a barrage of untrue testimonials.